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Dealing With Corks

Posted by David on 5th Mar 2017

When it comes to opening wines sealed with cork, I use either one of two devices. Both are simple to master. The first is the trusty waiter’s friend. You can buy these anywhere, ranging in price from a few dollars, right up to a few hundred dollars. Make sure you get one with the double hinge (which most do). This feature not only makes it much easier to pull the cork out, it puts less sideways pressure on the cork. This is important for older, weaker and more brittle corks, making them les
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Jeroboam or Methuselah?

Posted by David on 5th Mar 2017

You didn't think it would be straightforward did you? There are two main naming conventions for bottle size - one covers Champagne and Burgundy, the other of course covers Bordeaux. Here they are:
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Penny Pincher Pinot

Posted by David on 16th Feb 2017

With the heat of summer persisting for the moment, I’m not quite ready to sup a heavy red - but I want more than a rosé. Do you really need an excuse to drink Pinot?But Pinot is relatively expensive, indeed some of the world’s most expensive wines are Pinots. It’s easy to spend over $50 on a good Otago Pinot - don’t get me started on Burgundy! Where else can you spend over $100 and still not be sure it’ll be good? So why is it so hard to get a decent Pinot at a reasonable price? I did a bit of r
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Warm Weather Whites

Posted by David on 2nd Feb 2017

After the excesses of December and January, it’s back to work. And at this time of year wine needs to be affordable. Here are a couple of whites that fit the bill perfectly.One of the best regions for everyday quaffers is Puglia (anglicised name Apulia), located in the very southeast corner of the ‘high heel’ of Italy. It stretches about 320km along the Adriatic coast, as far as the Salento Peninsula, protruding into the Adriatic and Ionia Seas.Puglia is a beautiful place with sun-bleached lands
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Urbane Champagne

Posted by David on 7th Dec 2016

Sometimes it just has to be Champagne. Hundreds of years have gone into creating the unique association that Champagne has with celebration and unsurprisingly the Champenoise wish to keep it that way. Under international and EU laws, only wines made using the so-called ‘traditional method’ and made from grapes grown in the Champagne region (about 160km east of Paris) may be labelled as Champagne. I’ve always marvelled at the skill and effort that goes into making Champagne
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